Hear Happy This Fourth

Dos and Don’ts for Taking Little Ones to See Fireworks

If you have a newborn in the family, here’s what you need to know about Little One’s ears and fireworks.

Every detail of your family’s Fourth has been planned to a “T,” from the neighborhood barbecue to staking out the perfect spot to watch fireworks. But there’s one more thing to do: Grab Baby’s hearing protection.

While the iconic booms and pops of fireworks come with a thrill, they also put hearing at risk — especially for little ones. From what’s too loud to where to sit and what to do, here’s what you need to know to help keep your family’s hearing healthy this Independence Day and those to come.

Most adults think that because it doesn’t bother their hearing, it won’t bother Baby’s. This isn’t necessarily true — babies hear differently than adults. Loud sounds could potentially damage infants’ hearing and hinder auditory development.

“Babies …

Read More
Holidays with tinnitus

The sleigh bells are ringing — can you hear them?

The sounds of the holiday season — the church choir, little ones delighting in presents, friends reminiscing about holidays long ago — are what make the season merry and bright.

But if you are distracted by your tinnitus, holidays might not feel like much of a celebration. We want to help you hear the cheer, so read on for what you need to know about tinnitus and how to find relief. Though there’s no cure for tinnitus, there is hope. Tinnitus can be managed through strategies like medical treatments and/or subtle changes in your home environment.

About Tinnitus

Tinnitus: Isn’t a disease Isn’t curable May be a symptom of an underlying health condition Is a persistent ringing, whooshing, or buzzing in one or both ears Can only be heard by the affected individual

  Tinnitus may come and go for some, but others experience symptoms 24 hours a day, seven …

Read More
Protect your childs hearing

Are Your Kids’ Toys Hurting Their Hearing?

Seeing your kids or grandkids enjoying their favorite new toy that you got them can be a very endearing experience, but one thing we don’t always think about is that some toys that make noise can be harmful to your child’s hearing.

If loud enough and played with at close proximity, loud toys can cause noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, hearing is essential to speech and language development, communication, and learning.1

It causes delay in the development of speech and language It reduces academic achievement Communication challenges can lead to social isolation and low self-esteem. Experience fewer incidents of depression It can influence career options

 

How Loud Is Too Loud?

An estimated 5 million kids have noise-induced hearing loss — and it’s entirely preventable.2

The irreversible damage done by loud noise is dependent upon the decibel level (the sound pressure) and the length of …

Read More
Hearing loss & holiday season

Top 10 Ways to Hear Better for the Holidays

As the holidays approach, social gatherings, entertainment, and time with family becomes far more prominent. “This time of year is about connecting with what helps you embrace and celebrate the holidays, but it’s difficult to do that with a hearing impairment or other communication issues,” says our audiologist. “And it’s not just the person with the hearing impairment who is affected by the loss, it’s their loved ones and friends, too.”

Here are six tips to help you (or someone with a hearing impairment) hear happier this holiday season.

1. Work out your ears — and your brain. Research shows that musicians are better able to pick out voices amid background noise than people who don’t play music, but it is possible for anyone to learn these processes. Part of this is because of “brain fitness,” the idea that listening to music can help sharpen hearing. “The listener’s natural inclination …

Read More
Blunt-Force Trauma Can Cause Hearing Loss

Contact Sports and Hearing Loss

What are football players at risk of losing when playing to win?

August usually means a handful of things: It’s the last leg of summer, school is quickly approaching, and football is finally back. The return of football means many of us won’t leave our couches on Sundays (or Saturdays, depending on if you’re an NFL or college fan, or — well, let’s be honest, both!), but it also means more debate over just how dangerous the sport is.

According to ear surgeon John Leonetti, a Loyola University Medical Center doctor, retired NFL players may be at risk for more than just the effects of concussions, broken bones, and torn ligaments. According to Leonetti, they may also be at risk for permanent hearing loss and tinnitus due to repeated brain trauma.

Leonetti says there are two possible mechanisms by which repeated blows to the head could cause hearing damage: A …

Read More