Brushing Your Teeth Supports Your Hearing Health?

It’s All Connected: Surprising Ways Your Health Affects Your Hearing

In honor of World Health Day on April 7, 2019, let’s take a look at some surprising ways your physical health can impact your hearing health.

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with hearing loss, consider asking your physician or dentist about these other issues so you can keep on top of your overall health.

Cardiovascular Health

It’s been demonstrated many times over in the last few decades that heart health affects hearing health. But how? In your inner ear are tiny cells called hair cells. These convert sound into electrical signals that are sent to your brain to be interpreted. When you have cardiovascular problems, your heart can’t pump well enough for your hair cells to get sufficient blood, so they end up damaged or destroyed. As you lose hair cells, you lose hearing ability.

Diabetes

Hearing loss is roughly twice as prevalent in those with …

Read More
Easy Ways to Boost Heart Health

Easy Ways to Boost Heart Health

The human body is complex. So complex, in fact, that some things you read about it might seem downright far-fetched. For example, your heart health affects your hearing health.

The Heart–Hearing Link

That might sound a little squirrelly, but it’s supported by more than six decades of research. How are they connected?

Your inner ear is where sound waves get translated into a language — electrical impulses — that your brain understands. Structures critical to this translation process depend on nourishment from tiny blood vessels. When your heart doesn’t work well, those structures don’t get enough blood and, therefore, don’t work like they should, leading to hearing loss.

The connection is so strong that, in the event of a heart attack, it’s recommended that you get a hearing test to catch hearing loss early. It’s also been suggested that every hearing care patient’s history …

Read More
The Truth About Hearing Loss

How Prevalent Really is Hearing Loss Among Americans and Canadians?

How many people in your life have hearing difficulties? One person? Two people? A handful? No one? The actual number is quite possibly more than you think, because hearing loss — the inability or reduced ability to perceive sounds that enter the ear — is much more common than many realize.

In the United States and Canada together, for example, millions of people live with hearing loss. Numbers may vary per organization, government agency, or study, but:

Johns Hopkins researchers have estimated that 20 percent of Americans 12 or older — about one out of every five — has some form of hearing loss. The Canadian Hearing Society has stated that nearly a quarter of adult Canadians — close to one in four — has reported experiencing some level of hearing impairment.

In both countries, hearing loss also represents one of the top chronic physical …

Read More
Can Osteoporosis Cause Hearing Loss?

No Bones About It: Osteoporosis May Nearly Double Risk of Sudden Hearing Loss

What does osteoporosis, a potentially debilitating disease affecting some 10 million Americans and 2 million Canadians, have in common with conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, dementia, and other selected conditions? It can go hand in hand with hearing loss.

More specifically, at least one study links osteoporosis to a nearly doubled risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss, a disease that can touch people of all ages around the globe but primarily affects those in their 50s and 60s.

What Is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by weakened bones that are more vulnerable to breakage. It occurs when the normal process of old bone being replaced by new bone slows down, putting the person at greater risk of serious problems such as hip, wrist, and spine fractures.

Though some osteoporosis risk factors

Read More
Hear Better, Live Longer

Tips to Help You Live Longer With Hearing Loss

Hearing loss is linked to health conditions that can affect not only your well-being but also your life span. If you have a hearing loss, here is what you should know so you can be the happiest, healthiest you.

Your Balance

In a study published in JAMA, individuals with at least a mild hearing loss (25 decibels) lost their balance and fell more often than those with healthy hearing. There was an additional increase in the odds of a fall as hearing loss worsened; falls were about 1.4 times as likely for each 10-decibel increase in hearing loss.

The effects of hearing loss may mean that more brainpower is devoted to hearing than to balance. Posture and body control require brain activity that may be impaired due to hearing loss, throwing off a person’s balance. These distractions may increase the risk of falling.

According to the National Council …

Read More